Hunger Games – Allegory for us (part 2)

By | January 13, 2014 | 0 Comments
Last week I started a multi-series blog about The Hunger Games and lessons we can learn for our own Panem (the country of Hunger Games).  More upcoming topics will be:; 3) the distinction between common sense learned from applied learning and that which comes from “training;”  4) the separation within and between regions, cultures and communities.  It occurs to me that this week subtitle could indeed be a cross-over for a popular Reality TV series.
The Price We Pay to Eat—could you kill and eat a squirrel?
Katniss, the main character in The Hunger Games, is poor and from a single parent family.  In order for her family to survive, she enters her name in the reaping lottery for The Hunger Games multiple times over the year.  To explain: in the story a person can get “charity” in exchange for entering his/her name multiple times in the drawing which pulls one girl and one boy’s names for the Hunger Games.  squirrel
In this case, literally poor kids are at greater risk to die simply based on their financial state.  This is the case with Katniss. Again, this is fiction and described a dystopia, but how far a stretch is it to compare to low-income youth in our real world?  Are they also fated to a similar outcome?  Furthermore, illegal activities are vital to Katniss’ family’s survival.  Katniss helps to feed her family through illegal hunting, which she sells to community members.  It is this hunting which ultimately makes her such a good competitor.  Our heroine participates in the black market to make ends meet.  When was the last time we looked at a poor person who was selling illegal things as a hero?  Hmmm – let’s pause to think about this.

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